Concurrent Technical Session 1 | October 24, 2018 10:45 am

CONCURRENT SESSION 1
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2018   |   10:45 am

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TRACK 1   |   FLOOD HAZARD ID AND MAPPING
[CREDITS AVAILABLE: PE, CO, PP]

Title: WaterWatch Web Map Application for Regional Flood Awareness from the U.S. Geological Survey
Presented by:
Jon Janowicz  |  U.S. Geological Survey, New Jersey Water & Science Center

Abstract:

Real-time indication of regional flooding based upon streamflow conditions is available online at the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) WaterWatch web page (https://waterwatch.usgs.gov/).

This web tool displays maps, graphs and tables of current and historic flood conditions at USGS streamgage locations across the United States. WaterWatch is a complement to forecasts, watches and warnings provided by the National Weather Service (NWS). Information from WaterWatch can be used to initiate early emergency coordination as well as plan post-flood data collection efforts.

This presentation will introduce the capabilities of WaterWatch to identify conditions of flooding at various map scales and at various thresholds of severity related to NWS flood stages. WaterWatch can display current streamflow conditions, updated hourly, as well as display daily flood conditions from 2006 to present. The Flood Tracking Chart within WaterWatch relates the current condition to historic flood peaks at individual streamgages for their full period of record. The Flood Table Builder provides detailed hydrologic information across user-defined areas for user-specified dates in a flexible format. WaterWatch is easy to navigate and provides useful data for purpose of flood awareness and response.

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Title: Oh, Those Approximate A Zones!
Presented by:
Cleighton D. Smith, PE, CFM  |  Taylor Wiseman & Taylor

Abstract:

Approximate A zones have been a problematic part of FEMA’s floodplain maps for many years. The original intent of these zones was to map flood risk in sparsely populated areas that had development potential using inexpensive tools. Unfortunately, today approximate A zones exist in densely populated areas, presenting a host of problems. This presentation will focus on this problem in NJ and will suggest a few potential solutions.

Individuals in approximate A zones face mandatory flood insurance requirements, but since there is no Base Flood Elevation (BFE) data: (1) insurance premiums are higher, and (2) challenging the mapping is difficult without a BFE.

The presenter has assisted many homeowners in populated area A zones get Letters of Map Amendment. However, NJ as a FEMA CTP, has the resources to provide solutions to these problems. The Letter of Map Revision (LOMR) process can be used to convert approximate A zones to AE zones, showing the BFE. NJDEP Stream Encroachment and Flood Hazard Area permits have required detailed hydrology and hydraulics for streams greater than 50 acres for many years. This is a potential source for converting A zones to AE zones. Other potential solutions will be proposed in the presentation.

A pilot study in a selected county would help NJDEP identify the pros/cons, costs, and other issues related to converting A zones to AE zones.

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Title: Mapping Flood and Climate Hazards to Guide Resilience Planning
Presented by:
Hilary Stevens  |  Coastal Risk Consulting

Abstract:

In coastal areas around the country, communities are facing the challenges of rising water. Flooding due to sea level rise, storm surge, and intense rainfall is becoming more frequent in New Jersey and elsewhere. Coastal Risk Consulting (CRC) has developed a flood risk assessment tool for mapping areas at risk of inundation. Our model is built on publicly available data sets from agencies such as NOAA, FEMA and USGS. Our technology is available to local governments, private organizations and property owners to enable them to make better-informed decisions about protecting existing developments, designing new construction, and long term planning. For municipalities, we can generate a community-wide vulnerability assessment and make recommendations for appropriate adaptation measures.

CRC has worked with municipalities such Miami Shores Village, Florida, to help local leaders plan for sea level rise and climate change. CRC conducted a public meeting to raise awareness and gather feedback about flooding hotspots and residents’ priorities. CRC worked with village staff to develop levels of service to guide adaptation projects. In collaboration with civil engineering partners, CRC generated maps detailing infrastructure at the neighborhood scale that was at risk of inundation. Our team developed recommendations for infrastructure investments to address the flooding, such as road and roadbed improvements, stormwater conveyance, and converting septic tanks to sanitary sewer. This project provided officials the information they needed to develop budgets and plan for improvements over the coming years and decades.

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TRACK 2   |   FLOOD MODELING
[CREDITS AVAILABLE: PE]

Title: XPSWMM: New Highly Parallelized Scheme Benchmark Results
Presented by:
Matthew Anderson, PE CFM  |  Innovyze

Abstract:

Hardware and software advances now allow engineers to simulate Integrated 1D/2D Hydrologic and Hydraulic simulations with reasonable simulation times. XPSWMM is a nationally FEMA approved model for 1D and 2D hydraulics. Recent enhancements to XPSWMM now take advantage of multiple core processors and GPU cards in a new highly parallelized scheme. Previously, the software used a single core or was restricted to 2D only models using a GPU card.

This new solution scheme will be presented and benchmarked against the previous “classic” solution, InfoWorks ICM and HEC-RAS. The benchmarked models will be representative of urban floodplain models and include traditional benchmark models from FMA and the UK Environment Agency. Fast model run times are the goal for risked based assessments involving many simulations and adaption of the model for flood forecasting and live modeling.

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Title: 2D Hydraulic Analysis using SRH-2D
Presented by:
Sandra Blick  |  NJDOT
Kevin Bancroft  |  NJDOT
Jeepsi Patel, PE., CFM  |  Jacobs Engineering Group Inc.
Steven C. Flormann, PE., CFM  |  HNTB Corporation

Abstract:

NJDOT is participating in the FHWA Initiative of Collaborative Hydraulics: Advancing to the Next Generation of Engineering (CHANGE). Under this initiative, NJDOT is performing pilot studies using the Sedimentation and River Hydraulics two-dimensional (SRH-2D) river modeling to do the following: analyze the floodplain, improve our understanding of complex flow conditions, and to determine its applicability for use in future projects in coordination with the NJDEP. Four different types of projects were evaluated: No culvert or bridge, fluvial existing conditions versus proposed bridge/culvert analysis, weir flow over the roadway and one subject to tidal downstream conditions. We will be discussing the data needs associated with each type of project, strengths and challenges associated with the model development, troubleshooting the model, and comparison with the 1D HEC-RAS results. Additionally, we will be providing our recommendations going forward with usage of the software and other future uses including robust scour analysis.

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TRACK 3   |   FLOODPROOFING
[CREDITS AVAILABLE: PE, CO, PP]

Title: Non-Residential Dry Floodproofing: How and What?
Presented by:
Brendan Kane, CFM  |  Floodproofing.com
Brian Johnson, CFM  |  Floodproofing.com

Abstract:

The purpose of dry floodproofing a building is to make it watertight to floods for a limited time and depth. It can be an appropriate alternative for flood mitigation when relocating or elevating buildings is not cost-effective or technically feasible.

Dry floodproofing is a mixture of the structure’s walls being engineered to withstand the design flood load and protection systems, whether fixed or deployable, to protect permeable areas.

This course will provide a look into the FEMA regulations, code requirements, and products available to properly dry floodproof a non residential structure. Real life case studies will be examined to give participants a better idea of how this strategy is used.

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Title: Synthetic Sheet Piling for Flood Protection
Presented by:
Paul Schmitz  |  CMI
Brendan Sheppard  |  CMI

Abstract:

Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and Composite (FRP) sheet piling have been used for over 25 years in a wide range of marine and civil construction projects as a replacement for steel, concrete and timber materials. Designers of flood protection projects along the Gulf Coast and Atlantic Ocean are looking for solutions meeting their structural requirements, but also providing cost effective, corrosion resistant and low maintenance designs. PVC and FRP sheeting can be viable solutions to meet all these requirements. This presentation will present several cases studies where PVC and FRP sheet piling have been used as flood protection for critical installations. The presentation will focus on 2 case studies in particular; a flood wall around a wastewater treatment facility in Atlantic City and a freeboard increase for a levee surrounding a manufacturing facility in Louisiana.

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Title: Flood Protection Measures: When, Where, and How?
Presented by:
Jeffery Roushey |  ILC Dover
Jenna Matthews |  ILC Dover

Abstract:

Severe weather events, king tides, rising sea levels – the risk of flooding is very real, even if you haven’t flooded in the past. What do you do if you can’t elevate, build a levy, or wet flood proof? Dry flood proofing is becoming a viable option with recent technology improvements, but how should you determine the best technology to use for your site? Often acquisition cost is the number one metric for selection, but this method is rarely in the best interest of the client nor does it always comply with building codes.

In this discussion, we will examine the critical requirements for selecting or approving a mitigation solution, such as flood elevation, water velocity, impact loads, life cycle costs, maintenance, ease of deployment, and acquisition costs. Also, references to the source of requirements for flood mitigation designs like ASCE 24, ASCE 7, FEMA Technical Bulletins, and other sources will be included in the conversation.

With 10 years in the flood mitigation industry and over 75 years designing life critical systems like the NASA spacesuit, airships, and pharmaceutical containment systems, ILC Dover would like to share their experiences and lessons learned in designing and specifying flood mitigation systems.

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TRACK 4   |   HAZARD MITIGATION PLANNING
[CREDITS AVAILABLE: PE, CO, PP]

Title: Coming Together – How 4 Communities are Rising Above Floods
Presented by:
Heather Apgar |  Tetra Tech

Abstract:

The communities of Avalon, Ocean City, Sea Isle City, and Stone Harbor understand the importance of teamwork and coming together in the time of need. During Winter Storm Jonas in 2016, over a foot of snow fell across some parts of New Jersey. However, it also led to record flooding along the barrier islands of Cape May County. These four communities experienced major flooding that led to evacuations of homes in low-lying areas. They realized something had to be done to help the homeowners suffering from repeated flood damages and increase the overall resilience in their communities. As a result of the storm damages, President Obama declared a major disaster for New Jersey, making Cape May County eligible for HMGP funding. The communities of Avalon, Ocean City, Sea Isle City, and Stone Harbor saw this as their opportunity to help their residents. With Ocean City as the sub-grantee, representing all four communities, a grant application was developed and submitted. In December 2017, the municipalities were notified that the application was awarded to elevate 28 homes. The communities contracted Tetra Tech to assist with grant administration and project management of the elevations. Working closely together with the four communities, a coordinated approach to the project was developed. The project kicked-off with homeowners and home elevation contractors in May. At this time, it was emphasized the importance of communication with the municipalities and Tetra Tech, and keeping organized – saving all receipts, contracts, etc. – to ensure smooth sailing during the entire project. Working side-by-side, the municipalities, homeowners, and contractors are helping rise above floods. Elevating the homes in the communities are aiding in preparing for the next storm, lowering flood insurance, and protecting from future floods

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Title: Bring the People to the Floodplain
Presented by:
John Dening  |  Mott MacDonald

Abstract:

At their most fundamental level flood control projects are barriers in that they create a wall between the populous and the flood. Like many of the famous walls in history, Hadrian’s Wall or the Great Wall, they serve as much as to keep the builders on one side as they serve to keep the danger on the other. The levee or floodwall meant to hold back the flood waters, holds back the population from the river. It creates both a visual and psychological barrier between the residents and the river. But what if it doesn’t have to be this way. What if the levee could serve as an amenity to draw people to the river and to allow them to experience it’s beauty while protecting them from it fury. The City of Elizabeth is accomplishing exactly that, to both control the river and to embrace it.

The City of Elizabeth (City) is New Jersey’s fourth largest city with a population of over 125,000. Directly through the heart of the City runs the Elizabeth River which experiences tidal and fluvial flooding. In the early 1980’s the ACOE completed construction of a flood control for the Elizabeth River Basin which included earthen levees, concrete floodwalls and channels, ponding areas (stormwater detention basins), interior drainage structures and pumping stations along the Elizabeth River. Following Sandy, the flood control project required extensive rehabilitation. As part of the rehabilitation the City integrated a river walk to connect the City’s commercial and residential areas while drawing people in to experience the river.

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TRACK 5   |   EDUCATION & OUTREACH
[CREDITS AVAILABLE: CO, PP]

Title: How Do We Encourage More People to Get Flood Insurance?
Presented by:
Rebecca Starosta, PE, CFM  |  AECOM

Abstract:

The United States was hit with a one-two-three punch of major hurricanes in the summer of 2017 with Harvey, Irma, and then Maria. The economic impacts of these storms are estimated to reach well into the 100s of billions of dollars. The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is in place to mandate property owners with property within the Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) to buy flood insurance if they have a mortgage. Unfortunately, for hundreds of thousands of people that were flooded, they were not mandated to get insurance and were not in the SFHA. Many were not aware of the benefits of purchasing flood insurance, and this gap in understanding leaves homeowners, insurance companies, and the government ill prepared to financially cover past, present and future storms.

With some of the fastest growing cities also becoming the costliest damaged cities in the world, it is time to look at how everyone – including local officials, state emergency managers, private sector partners, and FEMA – manage structures both in and outside of the SFHA. We need to evaluate how to encourage more property owners to purchase and maintain flood insurance through the NFIP, even if they are not mandated to or if they are not in the SFHA. This aligns with FEMA’s mitigation moonshot of doubling coverage by 2022.

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Title: NJAFM Position Statement and Legislative Updates
Presented by:
Brian Kempf, CFM  |  Sea Change Planning Services, LLC

Abstract:

In 2018, the NJAFM Legislative Committee completed the organization’s Policy Document/Position Paper. This discussion will overview the paper and touch on some of the issues covered in it. In addition, an update will be provided on recent legislative and regulatory issues facing floodplain managers in New Jersey.

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Title: A Resilient Coast, Program Update from the Office of Coastal and Land Use Planning
Presented by:
Nick Angarone  | NJDEP, Office of Coastal and Land Use Planning

Abstract:

The NJ DEP Office of Coastal Land Use Planning (OCLUP) reviews and administers New Jersey’s Coastal Management Program and provides grants, technical assistance, and data and analysis to support local and regional planning within the coastal zone. This presentation will highlight recent and ongoing activities within OCLUP, as well as future opportunities. This presentation will detail OCLUP’s effort to provide data, interactive mapping, and planning tools to support local coastal planning, ecological restoration, and risk management efforts. Examples of such activities include:

In 2017 OCLUP published the Building Ecological Solutions to Coastal Community Hazards – A Guide for New Jersey Coastal Communities, which advances practices to help coastal communities address coastal hazards. The guide was created under NFWF, which also funded several restoration and living shoreline projects that were managed by OCLUP and completed this year.

OCLUP recently launched a new citizen science program to monitor salt marshes along the coast to track their health and capacity to withstand future conditions. This program is supplemented by a recently initiated drone program.

OCLUP launched the Resilient NJ, a new regional planning grant program focused on flood risk. Resilient NJ will bring together municipalities and local stakeholders as Regional Teams with dynamic multi-disciplinary Consultant Teams comprised of planners, engineers, ecologists, designers, and other experts to address flood-related hazards at a regional scale in both riverine and coastal communities.

Finally, OCLUP will highlight existing data resources including the New Jersey Coastal Atlas, which includes numerous mapping products throughout New Jersey’s coastal zone.

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TRACK 6   |   VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENTS
[CREDITS AVAILABLE: PE, CO, PP]

Title: Beyond Nuisance Flooding – Determining the Onset of Chronic Flooding in Coastal Communities
Presented by:
Thomas Herrington, PhD  | Urban Coastal Institute, Monmouth University

Abstract:

Tidal flooding is among the most evident present-day impacts of global sea level rise (SLR). Numerous studies conducted in the last half decade have determined that SLR has led to an increase in the frequency of nuisance (minor) flooding in coastal communities due to the reducing gap between local high tide datum elevations and ground elevations. As sea levels continue to rise concerns exists as to when more substantive impacts form tidal flooding of greater frequency and duration will regularly occur. In this study, the historic water level observations at the NOAA tide gauge in Atlantic City are used to evaluate the present frequency and severity of tidal flooding in Ocean City, NJ. Using the most probably ranges of local SLR projections based on central estimates of the low-, medium- and high-emissions scenarios reported by the NJ Climate Adaptation Alliance, a determination of the frequency and extent of future flooding is generated. The results indicate that water elevations presently exceed the minor flood threshold level of 0.5m above Mean Higher High Water (MHHW) during 24 high tides per year and that under the low SLR projection water levels in 2050 and 2100 will exceed minor flooding on 80 and 288 high tides per year, respectively. It is concluded that there is a short window of 20 to 30 years within which coastal communities can prepare for the onset of chronic tidal flooding.

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Title: An Innovative Framework for High-Resolution Quantitative Assessment of Flood Resiliency of Coastal Communities
Presented by:
Mohammad Hosein Motamedi, PhD  |  Research Professor, Rowan University
Rouzbeh Nazari  |  Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering,  Rowan University

Abstract:

Buildings and infrastructures should incorporate both pre-event (preparedness and mitigation) and post-event (response and recovery) resilience activities to reduce destructive effects of an inland Flooding. Quantitative approaches for measuring resilience of buildings and infrastructures against flooding need to be developed. An innovative data-based driven method for quantification of flood resilience of a given structure type for different hurricane categories is proposed. The analysis is based on dimensionless analytical functions related to the variation of functionality during a period of interest, including the losses in the disaster and the recovery path. This evolution in time including recovery differentiates the resilience approach from the other approaches addressing the flood damage estimation and their momentary effects. Results of hydrodynamic flood simulations have been used that give insight in water depths and flow velocities in the study area. For the flood stage-damage model, in addition to flood characteristics, the effects of structural features such as building height, construction material type, age of building, foundation type, and general building configuration are added to the model. The developed methodologies allows for assessing the impact of different adaptation strategies on both micro-scale, individual structures, and macro-scale, an entire community in a Geographical Information Systems (GIS) environment. Results of this research and the case study will inform local municipalities, coastal community design and other stakeholders on how to increase flood resiliency of their built environment and their communities.

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TRACK 7   |   TRAINING
[CREDITS AVAILABLE: PE]

Title: HEC RAS Training
Presented by:
Michael Horst, PE, PhD   |  The College of New Jersey