Concurrent Technical Session 2 | October 24, 2018 2:00 pm

CONCURRENT SESSION 2
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2018   |   2:00 pm

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TRACK 1   |   FLOOD HAZARD ID AND MAPPING
[CREDITS AVAILABLE: PE, CO, PP]

Title: Visualizing Resiliency and Risk: The Index Point Mapping System and Planning Visualization Maps
Presented by:
Stan Slachetka, PP, AICP  |  T&M Associates

Abstract:

This session will describe the development and use of the Index Point System (IPMS) and Planning Visualization Maps, a new planning tool developed by the planners at T&M Associates that provides a visual representation of areas of the community showing a high degree of resiliency or conversely risk. Presenters will describe how the Index Point Mapping System and Planning Visualization Maps have been used in risk assessment and resiliency planning at the local, regional, and federal levels. The Index Point Mapping System and Planning Visualization Maps combine a planning algorithm and GIS mapping framework that allows policymakers and the public to easily visualize and evaluate complex planning issues such as resiliency and risk assessment, as well as sustainability and site selection. Using the Index Point Mapping System, a variety of factors are geospatially analyzed, and a relative point scale is assigned to each factor. Cumulative point scores are calculated for specific geographic units in the study area (e.g., parcels). These scores are then visually represented as a color gradient within the Planning Visualization Map and in related spreadsheet data. T&M’s Resiliency Index Point Mapping can be used to inform the development of a variety of planning documents and response and recovery strategies, including, but not limited to: floodplain management plans, hazard mitigation plans, comprehensive plans and master plans, and strategic recovery plans. It can also be embedded into various local ordinances (e.g., floodplain management and zoning ordinances), and facilitate the planning of capital investments at the local and regional levels. The resiliency and risk factors and associated points are developed with stakeholder input and can vary depending the jurisdiction or geographic region that is being evaluated. The Index Point Mapping System is versatile and can be adjusted to different types of geographies, including parcels, watersheds, flood hazard areas, and levee protection areas. As applied to site selection it can be used to identify the most appropriate sites based on resiliency, risk, and sustainability factors. It also has been approved as part of court settlements and embedded into municipal ordinances. This session will describe the IPMS and Planning Visualization Maps and use examples to show how they have been applied in risk assessment and resiliency planning in New Jersey and elsewhere.

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Title: Adapting to an Elusive ‘New Normal’: What Will it Take?
Presented by:
Dorina Frizzera  |  Getting to Resilience, LLC
Jessica Rittler Sanchez  |  Getting to Resilience, LLC

Abstract:

Darwin cautioned that “It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one MOST RESPONSIVE to change.” In the face of record-breaking and repetitive coastal and riverine flooding, NJ has embraced the need for mitigation planning. New tools are available for predicting and envisioning the possible new boundaries of flooding and V-zones and grants have been made available for hazard planning, but is that enough? A community is more than its flood zone.

With accelerating sea level rise and increasing uncertainty in weather patterns, communities may already feel they are inundated and unsure of what actions to take beyond elevating structures and revising evacuation plans. The policy-world is stagnant at best: the NFIP needs reauthorization; no plans are evident to revise the CRS; rebuilding remains a preferred outcome; regulatory and investment decisions are still made on the basis of static maps. Where is adaptation? What actions can a community take to improve its chances of weathering the monolith of Climate Change?

The authors contend that there are policy and assessment voids to be filled to enable realistic and responsible actions for adapting to expected changes. Among them are reasonable targets and consideration of the economic impacts associated with expected loss of ratables. Foremost, we must develop a series of time horizon bridges. Once investors, insurers and utility providers start using the flood line or V-zone as a redline for services, it will be too late to assemble a Plan B. We hope to engage session participants in a dialog on what will trigger an effective survival response.

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Title: Using LiDAR Data to Support Letters of Map Amendment (LOMAs): What Submitters Need to Know
Presented by:
Andrew Brown  |  Michael Baker

Abstract:

LiDAR is a remote sensing technology capable of efficiently creating accurate topographic data at a large scale. In February 2018, FEMA approved program standard #627 allowing the use of LiDAR data to support LOMA requests meeting identified criteria. In these circumstances, homeowners can use LiDAR data in lieu of obtaining certified elevations. This can significantly reduce the financial burden for homeowners submitting for a LOMA.

This session is designed to inform the audience about this new standard. Discussions include what LiDAR data is acceptable and what types of MT-1 requests are appropriate for LiDAR use. The audience will be presented with all FEMA’s requirements for submitting successful LOMA applications using LiDAR data, including what data must be shown on LiDAR exhibits to be accepted by FEMA.


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TRACK 2   |   STORMWATER MANAGEMENT
[CREDITS AVAILABLE: PE]

Title: Enabling Best Practices for Stormwater Through a Standards-Based Framework
Presented by:
Ricardo Lopez-Torrijos

Abstract:

Municipalities and Stormwater Authorities confront significant challenges in getting their arms around their goals and workload. They must cover the update of asset inventories, integration of business and technical information, planning and managing improvements and maintenance, and communication with multiple partners, funding sources and regulators. Key for alignment of the diverse workload is having the base information set in a framework allowing its use in all workflows. Tools drawing data from such information framework enable the alignment. Incorporation of existing and emerging Standards and Best Practices for water related data provides the framework.

Bringing experiences in stormwater system mapping projects large and small, from Washington DC to Kingston, NY, the presentation shows how standards for hydrography, stormwater, and hydrologic and hydraulic modeling are the framework that allows tying the base information to workflows, communication and funding activities. Reviewed best practices include: LiDAR based updates; road culvert and stormwater sewer system inventory and characterization; integration with surface runoff, Natural Resource Inventory and Green Infrastructure. Mapping and modeling standards covered include NAACC for culvert inventory, high resolution NHDPlus for surface and stormwater system integration, StreamStats and the National Water Model for H&H modeling, and other emerging stormwater system mapping standards.

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Title: Stormwater Management Best Management Practices Inventory (Tools to Locate, Record and Maintain BMPs)
Presented by:
Lori Wade  |  Michael Baker Intl
Eric Martinelli  |  Michael Baker Intl

Abstract:

Various federal, state, and local agencies are responsible for maintaining stormwater infrastructure and Best Management Practices (BMPs) such as detention and infiltration basins and swales within their jurisdiction. However, a complete database of these systems is not in place for many of these departments. Michael Baker has been contracted by the New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) and other agencies to inventory and record these systems which will assist with existing conditions analyses, future maintenance requirements, and estimated costs. Specifically, Michael Baker is providing services to NJDOT for one of three contracts (Central Region) as part of the Identification, Assessment and Analysis Program to inventory stormwater management basins and stormwater outfalls for points of surface water discharge state-wide. The Central Region includes over 500 miles of roadway to inventory, consisting of over 3,000 outfalls. To complete this work effectively and efficiently, Michael Baker is utilizing GIS software applications including Collector for ArcGIS and Survey123 for mobile data collection. Collector is a great tool that uses GPS to drop drainage structure points into a GIS database in real time. Survey123 is utilized to collect information about the existing conditions, including pictures and video. Michael Baker completes these stormwater inventory projects in accordance with our regulations to Stop, Look, Assess and Manage our field tasks so that we can collect, record and report the data for our client.

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Title: A Lifecycle Approach to Stormwater Maintenance: Making the Case for Asset Management
Presented by:
Alexis A. Taylor  | Outreach Team Leader, NJDEP

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TRACK 3   |   HAZARD MITIGATION PLANNING
[CREDITS AVAILABLE: PE, CO, PP]

Title: Innovative Coastal Hazard Mitigation Project for Red Hook Community, Brooklyn, NY
Presented by:
Rahul Parab  |  Dewberry

Abstract:

In October 2012, Hurricane Sandy’s coastal storm surge exposed the flood vulnerability within the Red Hook community in Brooklyn, New York City. This coastal storm surge flooded over 75 percent of the Red Hook area, affected over 10,000 residents, and resulted in huge economic losses for the businesses and residential properties. To address the Red Hook community’s existing and future flood vulnerabilities, the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC) partnered with the New York City Mayor’s Office of Recovery and Resiliency (ORR) to perform a feasibility study to identify ways to reduce flood risks from coastal storm surge and sea-level rise which would improve Red Hook’s overall resiliency. In October 2015, EDC and ORR engaged Dewberry’s multidisciplinary team to develop a solution that will help NYC meet FEMA’s Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) funding requirement. The Dewberry Team developed a conceptual design by working closely with all major New York city agencies with input from the community to ensure the solution is technical feasible, meets community’s goals and satisfies all the federal requirements. A detailed field investigation and analysis of existing site conditions that includes items such as subsurface conditions, topography, building typology, waterfront structures and others provided the team with potential areas available for the placement of a coastal flood risk reduction system alignment. Through an iterative approach, Dewberry developed five potential alignments with set of applicable coastal flood intervention typologies for varying levels of coastal Design Flood Elevations (DFE). Dewberry developed innovative and first-of-its kind integrated coastal and stormwater model to test the effectiveness of these alignments and evaluate any potential impacts on the existing drainage conditions within the study area. With input from the community and various New York City agencies, a proposed conceptual project which would provide flood risk reduction benefits from a 10-year coastal storm plus 1 foot of Sea Level Rise was developed by Dewberry to maximize coastal resiliency benefits while minimizing negative impacts on the Red Hook community. The $104 million proposed conceptual project will provided flood risk reduction benefits for approximately 3,000 residents and 400 buildings and is designed to allow for future climate change adaptability. The system is completely passive and uses innovative approach to combine floodwall system with raising of roadway to completely eliminate need for deployable closure structures.

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Title: Sea Level Rise: Has Hazard Mitigation Met Its Match?
Presented by:
Darryl Hatheway  | AECOM

Abstract:

It seems that most agree that sea level rise is contributing to our disappearing coast. This presentation will examine whether or not our current mitigation strategies can be successful in saving our beaches and dunes – both on the New Jersey open coast and inland bays. There is plenty of evidence that we are seeing some success at mitigating buildings through elevating foundations and building stronger, but improvements in long-term coastal protection is primarily coming from coastal structures combined with beach nourishment. How long can we hold back the rising tides, waves and storm surge.

This presentation looks at the impacts of why we should focus on fortifying our inland bay shorelines before the barrier island disappears. Will a new strategy enhance the mitigation efforts and protection of new waves of storm-induced inland flooding and damages in these areas?

There are some key questions to be discussed:
• Review ways to mandate new coastal development approaches?
• Examine whether new comprehensive plans can be adopted for safer communities?
• Evaluate evidence in NJ that rebuilding stronger after a disaster like Hurricane Sandy will help sustain hazard mitigation efforts.
• Since sea level rise can’t be stopped, will attempts to hold back the tide, surge, and waves be a cost-beneficial effort?
• Can we reshape our coasts through new concepts in hazard mitigation?

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Title: Large-scale Acquisitions in Floodplain Management & Associated Ecosystem Services
Presented by:
Julia Rinaldi  |  Stantec
John Bucher, AICP

Abstract:

As part of the continuing effort to reduce flood risk, this project employed FEMA’s Benefit-Cost Analysis (BCA) methodology on eight project areas in New Jersey to study the cost-effectiveness of selected mitigation approaches. Primarily, the differences in acquiring multiple structures on contiguous land (“largescale acquisitions”) versus the more common approach of acquiring individual structures with favorable benefit-cost ratios (BCR) (“checkerboarding”) were investigated. Secondarily, this project investigated the implications of using national versus regional-specific ecosystem service benefit (ESB) values.

The project team sought to justify largescale acquisitions as more cost-effective given the anecdotal observation that it is generally more strategic for a larger community to acquire entire neighborhoods prone to flooding rather than utilizing the more selective checkerboarding approach. Although our results indicated that largescale acquisitions infrequently had higher BCRs than checkerboarding, it is worth noting that the scope of benefits considered in this study was limited to only structural, content, and environmental. Given the production of higher overall benefits to a community, even more so after the addition of social and economic benefits, we argue that largescale acquisitions should still be considered on a case-by-case basis with careful assessment.

This study also illustrated how different values for ESBs (e.g. X versus Y dollars per acre of forestland per year) can significantly impact overall BCA results. This finding highlighted the importance of using appropriate values when it comes to ESBs, and thus the need for more locally appropriate values. This is particularly important so that the same values are not used for geographic areas with vastly different ecosystem services, natural resources, and community values. Furthermore, it is recommended that State and Federal agencies work towards establishing common classification systems for ESBs to promote consistency within the BCA process and across those working in flood mitigation.

Overall, key takeaways from this study include:
• Large-scale acquisitions that restore an area to a natural state offer higher overall benefits to communities than traditional checkerboard acquisitions;
• Large-scale acquisitions are a viable option for communities that can produce favorable BCRs;
• Each mitigation project is unique and specific to the individual conditions and parameters of the study area;
• Considerations such as type of restoration and ESB values are important when evaluating projects; and
• Rules of thumb are not easily established, requiring further exploration into individual benefits and a greater study area.


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TRACK 4   |   GIS
[CREDITS AVAILABLE: PE ]

Title: Peak Flow Estimation Tools for Culverts and Catch Basin Assessment
Presented by:
Benjamin H. Houston, PE

Abstract:

Stormwater infrastructure is under siege. System upgrades, replacements and repairs require prioritization of limited capital dollars to ensure the greatest impact for the least cost. The Water Resources Institute at Cornell University (WRI) has been developing a set of GIS based tools to help. A partnership with GroundPoint Engineering has enhanced those tools to leverage current, high resolution LIDAR and Land Cover data. Key to the success of these analytical tools is the availability of public domain (aka “free”) high resolution data, and the ability to derive and maintain GIS data layers that support long term program goals.

This presentation will demonstrate how an adaptation of WRI’s GIS based approach can be applied to both culverts and catch basins to more accurately determine the runoff characteristics and peak flow estimates used in infrastructure design and volume capacity calculations. The use of standards-based data structures for information such as culvert location and physical characteristics simplifies the application of these tools in comparing predicted results against current capacity. In addition, the resulting drainage calculations aid in the determination of where underground pipes or road culverts may be overloaded based on 5, 10, or 20-year magnitude storm predictions.

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Title: Substantial Damage Estimation: Using Hazus-MH as a Screening Tool after Hurricane Harvey
Presented by:
Alison Miskiman  |  Tetra Tech

Abstract:

Following the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey in the Houston, Texas area, Tetra Tech, Inc. was tasked with using FEMA’s Hazus software as a recovery tool to assist in screening and estimating substantial damage to individual properties and structures. This project used Tax Assessor Data, LiDAR building footprints, USGS Stream Gage data, HEC-RAS flood models, FEMA DFIRM data, ArcGIS and Hazus to create a user-defined facility analysis of the affected areas and deliver a final product in both spatial and tabular form which allowed Fort Bend & Montgomery County Emergency & Floodplain Managers to see substantial damage estimates to the building stocks in their respective counties. The final deliverable classified structures based on Hazus results into different priority tiers for inspection teams in the field to ground-truth. This process streamlined the initial stages of substantial damage estimation for use in NFIP recovery procedures. In addition to developing a Hazus model re-creation of the flooding associated with Hurricane Harvey, this project also was able to compare Hazus estimates of damage with assessed damage estimates from field inspections, validating the Hazus model and the depth-damage curves.

This presentation will inform the audience about current substantial damage estimation practices and the benefits and impacts of integrating technology in this case study. The audience will also gain an understanding of FEMA’s Hazus software and how Tetra Tech developed a model to streamline the substantial damage estimation process in the Houston area following Hurricane Harvey.

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Title: Challenges of Maintaining Up-to-Date GIS Data
Presented by:
Jack Flood, VP  |  Spatial Data Logic

Abstract:

GIS data projects are sometimes treated as “one-and-done” capital projects, and data integrity is often impaired by a lack of maintenance. The initial project frequently relies on third-party engineering firms who are contracted to complete an initial project but not incentivized to create a maintainable long-term solution.

The importance of maintaining usable municipal framework data became clear after Hurricane Sandy hit the state in 2012. The challenges of maintaining usable data involve a sustainable project management approach that accounts for:

· Allocating and training resources for ongoing data checking and updating
· Decisions on who “owns” the data and who can access it
· Labor, hardware and software costs
· Tying together information so relevant aerial imagery or infrastructure updates (e.g. sewer upgrades) trigger the data maintenance process
· In-house resources vs. contracted resources
· GIS and Business Systems – getting more value from the data you maintain
· A digital approach to updating, sharing and using GIS data electronically
· Using data outside of the sponsoring department
· Exploring options (e.g. intergovernmental service sharing)


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TRACK 5   |   INFRASTRUCTURE
[CREDITS AVAILABLE: PE, PP]

Title: Extreme Event Infrastructure and Stream Restoration: Wallis Run Case Study
Presented by:
Thomas Graupensperger  |  Dewberry

Abstract:

Hurricane Sandy, Tropical Storm Lee, and numerous unnamed, isolated, high-intensity, short-duration storm/flood events have resulted in major infrastructure damage. In recent years, Irma, Harvey and Maria have resulted in multi-billion dollar damages. This session will present a case study example project that resulted in improved resiliency and sustainability of vulnerable infrastructure by using Natural Stream Channel Design and Restoration techniques for integrated hazard reduction/mitigation.

We will look at opportunities where gray and green joint infrastructure rehabilitation and replacement are paired effectively with stream restoration activities. By effectively integrating resilient gray and green infrastructure improvements; through the creation, restoration and reconnection of natural resources (floodplains/wetlands/riparian buffers/aquatic habitat) maximum triple bottom line benefits are accrued.

To predict and model proposed stream restoration treatments and develop resilient scour countermeasures, we need to thoroughly understand and evaluate the contributing watershed and site specific hydromorphic vulnerabilities, failure mechanisms and sediment transport characteristics.

We will review these physiographic province and contributing watershed, site-specific hydromorphic characteristics and severe/extreme weather event impacts resulting in the project need:
• SR 1003, Bridge Replacement and Embankment Reconstruction, Wallis Run, Tributary to Loyalsock Creek, Lycoming County, PA

This presentation and specific case study will identify site hazard mitigation, restoration approaches, considerations and opportunities for:

• Joint Infrastructure Development using green and gray techniques
• Extreme event resiliency
• Flood/Shear Vulnerability Assessment/Analyses
• Proactive vs Reactive Channel Instability Restoration/Hazard Mitigation
• Local & Regional Sediment Management/Transport
• Habitat restoration and enhancement.

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Title: Applying Infrastructure Financing to Green Projects
Presented by:
David Zimmer  |  NJ Infrastructure Bank
Gene Chebra  |  NJDEP Municipal Finance and Construction Element

Abstract:

Green infrastructure is a critical tool in managing stormwater and reducing flooding. However, New Jersey’s iBank has typically been used to finance more traditional grey infrastructure. Understanding how this tried and true financing tool can be applied to green infrastructure is key to expanding the use of this technology throughout the state.

This workshop will introduce participants to the use of the Water Bank as a viable funding source for both green and grey infrastructure. A new, online Applicant’s Guide will be demonstrated, that will walk participants through the process of determining whether a project is eligible, what information is required to submit a successful application, and tips for developing an application that meets the criteria and that can be quickly approved. Topics covered include overview of the program, establishing a team, gathering application materials, understanding the financing end, and using the applicants’ guide.

 

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TRACK 6   |   NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE PROGRAM
[CREDITS AVAILABLE: CO, PP]

Title: An Update on the National Flood Insurance Program & Private Flood Insurance
Presented by:
Tyler Ardron, CFM  |  Risk Reduction Plus Group

Abstract:

Participants of this course will learn all the new news on the National Flood Insurance Program, the Reauthorization, and the 21st Century Reform Act. This course will also go over the Private marketplace, and how Private carriers are making strides in the ever changing flood insurance world.

Agenda:
• Review of the 21st Century Reform Act, and the Reauthorization as a whole.
• Difference between Private flood insurance and NFIP
• How Private flood insurance carriers are rating properties, and there coverage options

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Title: Private Flood Insurance and the NFIP: How to Know What’s the Right Choice
Presented by:
Lisa A. Sharrard, CFM, ANFI, CPM  |  Carolina Flood Solutions LLC

Abstract:

With the emergence of private flood insurance how do you know what choice is right for you. This presentation will review both options, the benefits of both private and NFIP coverage to help you identify the best fit for you and those who you are trying to counsel.

 

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TRACK 7   |   TRAINING
[CREDITS AVAILABLE: PE]

Title: HEC HMS Training
Presented by:
Michael Horst, PE, PhD   |  The College of New Jersey