Concurrent Technical Session 1 | October 16, 2019 11 am

CONCURRENT SESSION 1
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2019   |   11:00 am

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TRACK 1   |   STRUCTURAL ELEVATION & FLOODPROOFING

Title:  Helical Piles: Design and Application – A Functional Perspective
Presented by:
Moncef Souissi   |  Cantsink

Abstract:

Over the past 30 years, helical piles have become increasingly common and widely used as a result of their wide range and versatility in foundation application. A helical pile is basically a factory manufactured steel foundation consisting of a central shaft with one or more helical shaped bearing plates (helices) affixed to it. The helical bearing plates serve as the individual bearing elements to resist both compression and tensile forces from the elevated structure. In addition, helical pile capacity can be predicted from the capacity-torque correlation, and therefore can be successfully used a quality assurance during construction.

Capacity-torque correlation has been considered the greatest attribute of helical pile foundation. To this date, the capacity torque ratio used in the helical pile industry is based on the published values in AC 358, an acceptance criterion issued by ICC-ES. These published values are a function of pile shaft diameter only. In this presentation, a new capacity- torque correlation is presented. It is based on the study and analysis of over 800 field load tests. The new formula takes into consideration the effect of shaft size and shape, helix configuration, axial load direction and installation torque. In addition, the presentation will show how helical piles can provide a low-cost alternative to rebuilding in flood plain regions due to their versatility, ability to support structures located near bays or beaches, and where access, vertical and horizontal clearances are limited

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Title:  Designing a Dry Flood Proofing System – Beyond the Design Flood Elevation
Presented by:
Jeffrey Roushey, PE, CFM | Engineering Manager, ILC Dover, LP
Remy Victoria | Design Engineer, ILC Dover, LP.

Abstract:

Often dry flood proofing systems are specified only by the protection height required per the FIRM and local code requirements. Evidence from past flood events show this is often an insufficient means of specifying flood barriers, especially in an urban environment. In cities, the built environment can vary dramatically within the same block or property highlighting just how difficult it is to use the one size fits all specification of design flood elevation. Other requirements such as limited storage space when not in use, ease and speed of deployment, limits on encroachment into the public right of way when deployed, and realistic debris impact forces and it can be seen how innovative designs of flood barrier systems will be required to protect the growing flood threat in our cities.

This discussion will expand upon the session’s previous presentation by Thornton Tomasetti by covering the effect of design considerations besides just the design flood elevation. Debris impact, water velocity, deployment time, storage location and space, maintenance, and installation constraints of barrier systems must be considered in order to provide the protection critical facilities require, especially in an urban environment. The utility vaults at a medical research facility in a major healthcare campus in New York City will be used as a case study to highlight the influence on the design of a flood barrier system, when more than the DFE is considered.

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Title:  Designing a Dry Flood Proofing System – Beyond the Design Flood Elevation
Presented by:
Aditya Bhagath, PE | Senior Project Director, Thornton Tomasetti Inc.

Abstract:

Extreme weather events are increasing in intensity and frequency leading to concerted efforts by regulatory authorities on mitigating the impacts on people, property and businesses. As designers and engineers tasked with improving the resilience of infrastructure in the urban environment, we rely on guidance from codes like ASCE24 and ASCE7 to help inform mitigation measure design. Current building codes specify a flood elevation to which a structure is to be designed, but this does not ensure the long-term resilience of a structure given rising sea levels. Many other aspects are left open to interpretation.

This presentation delves into consideration of site-specific flood parameters, projected sea level rise, floating debris impact and applying performance based criteria for flood mitigation components to ensure a resilient flood mitigation strategy. This discussion will use a flood mitigation project case study focused on protection of utility vaults in a medical research facility, which is part of a major medical campus in New York City. The protection of these vaults is a critical component of the flood mitigation strategy for the wider campus and the study explores how it was assessed in terms of risk due to flooding, site-specific flood loading and the process of choosing a flood barrier that met the design constraints. Following this discussion will be a presentation by ILC Dover with an in depth look at how these design considerations affect the development of flood barriers with a focus on an innovative flood barrier system, custom designed to protect the utility vaults.

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TRACK 2   |   COMMUNITY RATING SYSTEM (CRS)

Title:  NJ Counties CRS Assistance Programs
Presented by:
Joe Barris, PP | Assistant Director Monmouth County Division of Planning

Abstract:

Because there are no “unincorporated lands” in New Jersey, counties are not eligible to participate in the NFIP’s CRS program. However, being non eligible does not equate to being non involved. Monmouth, Ocean, and Morris Counties have all initiated their own CRS municipal assistance programs to help towns either enter into or advance within the national CRS program. Although each county takes a similar approach in providing assistance, each faces distinct physical, technical, and political challenges in offering this type of service.

This session will explore how each county program works and the types of support they provide CRS communities in their jurisdiction.

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Title:  Creating Effective Public Outreach Materials
Presented by:
Susanna Pho, CFM | Forerunner

Abstract:

Participation in the Community Rating System (CRS) is an increasingly popular option for communities facing high flood insurance costs. While many CRS coordinators find value in customizing their outreach campaigns, producing marketing assets can be a challenge. Beyond criteria fulfillment, CRS outreach represents a crucial interaction point between your municipality and community members. Well designed materials with clear messages can have a huge effect on engagement with your floodplain management programs.

In this session we’ll discuss defining your target audience, messaging, effective graphic designs, and accessibility. The lessons-learned will be applied to materials that communities commonly create for 300 series activities.

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Title:  NFIP CRS and What NJ Communities Need to Know
Presented by:
Marianne Luhrs, AICP | FEMA Region 2

Abstract:

No community can have a 100% perfect record when it comes to NFIP enforcement, can they? Answer: No. So what are the expectations FEMA has when conducting a Community Assistance Visit (CAV) specifically to assess a community’s readiness for joining the Community Rating System (CRS)? What does FEMA regard as a “substantive program deficiency” and what can a community do to correct them? What is a “substantive violation”, and, again, what can a community do to remedy them? What does it mean to resolve compliance matters “to the maximum extent practicable”? As the national CRS program evolves – with a sharper focus on NFIP compliance – what can communities – both those already in CRS and those aspiring to be – do to improve their odds of getting in – or staying in – CRS?

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TRACK 3   |   FLOOD & STORM HAZARD MITIGATION

Title:  Resilient Infrastructure
Presented by:
Thomas R. Decker, P.E., M.S.C.E. | Director – Water Resources, Jacobs Engineering Group Inc.

Abstract:

Resiliency is the ability to anticipate, mitigate against and recover quickly from the effects of climatic and extreme weather events. Impacts to our Infrastructure is of upmost importance. The presentation will provide an overview of the current trends and direction on Climate Change/Resiliency. A sampling of design guidelines, infrastructure project examples, and strategies for future planning and design projects will be presented.

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Title:  Development of a New Decision Support Tool for Multi-Hazard Resilience Assessment of Coastal Structures
Presented by:
Ross Nazari, PhD | Coastal Resiliency Group, Rowan University

Abstract:

Coastal and inland flooding has been a problematic occurrence, specifically over the past century. Global warming has caused an 8 inch sea level rise since 1990, which made the coastal flood zone wider, deeper and more damaging. Additionally, riverine flooding is extremely damaging to the coastal communities’ substructure and economy as well which causes river banks to overflow, inundating low-lying areas. Low-lying coastal areas at severe risk for flood hazard, sea level rise, land depletion, economic loss, property damage, destroy habitat destruction, and also threaten human health and safety which are the main study area of this work. A decision making framework is being built to help mitigate the impacts of the environmental and economical dangers of storm surges, sea level rise, flashfloods and inland flooding. With vigorous research and the use of innovative hydrologic modeling, this tool can be utilized to help with resiliency planning for coastal communities. This will allow the individuals living in a coastal community to understand the details of climatic hazards in their area and risks associated to their communities.  This tool also suggest the best solution for the problem each community faces. The results and benefits from the simulation and modeling techniques, allow coastal communities to choose the most appropriate method for building a long lasting and sustainable resilience plan in the future.

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Title:  The Future of Mitigation
Presented by:
Camille Graham |  Floodproofing.com

Abstract:

This course provides insight into the importance of proper foundation flood vents and compliance with Building Codes and FEMA standards and how they can effectively prevent major damage to buildings due to flooding. The course will review applicable codes pertaining to foundation flood venting, including a complete review of FEMA’s new Technical Bulletin TB-1.

After the course, participants will have a thorough understanding of the difference between non-engineered openings and engineered openings and the important role they play in designing a sustainable structure.

Learning Objectives:
• Describe floods, floodplains, and the potential hazards to buildings.
• Explain the differences between wet and dry floodproofing techniques and acceptable applications.
• Describe the role of flood openings in flood events to ensure resilient structures.
• Analyze the role of building compliance in securing reduced flood insurance rates and what mitigation.


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TRACK 4   |   HABITAT RESTORATION

Title:  Floodplain Restoration on NJ Blue Acres Property
Presented by:
Christine Pollack | Princeton Hydro

Abstract:

Princeton Hydro, in collaboration with the NJDEP Blue Acres Program, City of Linden, Rutgers University, Phillips 66, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, and Enviroscapes is undertaking one of the first ecological restoration projects within Blue Acres acquired properties, which are located in Union County’s City of Linden Tremley Point neighborhood. This project increases storm resiliency by reducing flooding and stormwater runoff by improving the ecological and floodplain function within the former residential properties acquired by the NJDEP Blue Acres Program.

This presentation will highlight the green infrastructure techniques employed including restoration of native coastal forest and meadow. Key points will be identified that discuss permissible restoration activities and the process for restoring Blue Acres acquired properties as well.

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Title:  The Creation of a Living Shoreline – 30 Hubbard Park, Red Bank, NJ
Presented by:
Kelly Klein | Princeton Hydro

Abstract:

Recent storms along the coast of New Jersey, sea level rise and nuisance flooding are causing increased erosion of New Jersey’s shoreline and elimination of shoreline vegetation and marshes. This has manifested itself in the form of destruction of the existing bulkhead structure on the 30 Hubbard Park property located in the Borough of Red Bank, Monmouth County, New Jersey. As such, the Navesink River shoreline in the area of the site is rapidly eroding and in need of repair.

Many of the properties in the area have opted for the traditional “hard” shoreline stabilization. While these structures have been successful in stabilizing the shoreline, they have a number of undesirable impacts on the shoreline and critical inter-tidal and nearshore habitats. 30 Hubbard Park, LLC proposes a living shoreline in order to reduce erosion by mimicking features of the natural environment through the incorporation of natural and ecologically sound practices.

The current design for the living shoreline at 30 Hubbard Park creates a 20-foot-wide strip of marsh along the Navesink River that smoothly transitions into a restored upland area extending an additional 30 feet landward. A variety of native vegetation is proposed to be planted. A marsh sill is proposed as the primary structural measure to protect the restored marsh and will serve to dissipate wave energy caused by wind and wake.

This project will serve as a demonstration project for public education as well as serve as a model project for private homeowners looking to establish living shorelines.

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Title:  Evaluating Design Criteria for Channel Improvements
Presented by:
Julie E. Greenfield | HDR

Abstract:

The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development awarded the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection funds to develop a pilot flood risk reduction project in the Meadowlands, NJ. Subsequently, HDR joined the team to assist in conducting a Feasibility Study and supporting the development of an Environmental Impact Statement. The development, refinement and screening of drainage improvement alternatives in the five-township, 5,500-acre project area was followed by the selection of a preferred alternative. This alternative includes the design and construction of channel improvements to the East Riser Ditch (ERD). These improvements consist of channel excavation, associated re-vegetation, and bridge/culvert replacements along a 4,200-ft reach. The ERD is highly urbanized and the channel banks are constricted laterally by parking lots and industrial buildings. In addition to a slight longitudinal slope, there is limited vegetation and steep slopes creating potential bank stability issues.

This presentation summarizes the methods used to advance design of the channel by establishing specific evaluation criteria, which were tied to the project purpose and need, and fell into the following categories: flood risk reduction, built human environment, natural environment; construction, operation and maintenance; benefits and cost. Specific constraints include easements and real estate, O&M access, overcut requirements, buildings (clearance, possible stabilization needs), structure upgrades, constructability considerations, channel bank stability, hydraulic capacity, and vegetation selection. This presentation will focus on the iterative process developed to advance design while maintaining pre-established hydraulic conveyance capacity improvements, maximizing ecological enhancements, and coordinating technical input from an interdisciplinary team of subject matter experts.

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TRACK 5   |   TRAINING

Title: HEC RAS Training
Presented by:
Michael Horst, PE, PhD   |  The College of New Jersey