Concurrent Technical Session 2 | October 16, 2019 2:00 pm

CONCURRENT SESSION 2
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2019   |   2:00 pm

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TRACK 1   |   FLOOD HAZARD ID AND MAPPING

Title: Navigating Through Difficult Terrains – A Stream Safety Survey 
Presented by:
Joseph Messina, PLS  |  The Nader Group
Wassim Nader, PE  |  Nader Group

Abstract:

This session will describe the development and use of the Index Point System (IPMS) and Surveying in unpredictable stream corridors can be unforgiving, especially in remote and hard to reach areas. Safety is paramount. Analyzing the mission in hand and preparing for it is essential to its ultimate success. Survey crews are required to attend a safety course specifically geared to familiar and non familiar streams and rivers. They have to study access in and out of streams and realize emergency routes. They have to investigate remote cellular access and ensure all equipment is in complete operating order. this equipment may include but not limited to life safety vests, ropes, boats, motors, ores, waders, and all traditional survey equipment. The team has to review aerial photography to analyze presence of rapids and falls and mark their location on their maps to avoid surprises that can lead to injury. A minimum of two people are required for any stream survey mission. sometimes three people. Never send one person alone.

The Nader Group performs these missions on a regular basis and have developed a procedure to ensure that safety is achieved to its maximum potential in every condition. We are happy to engage surveyors with any questions to assist them in understanding the potential risks associated with stream surveys and avoid dangerous and difficult situations. There are never any guarantees, however, preparation is the best guarantee.

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Title: The Art of Resilience – Including Cultural Resources in Coastal Resilience Plans
Presented by:
Joe Barris, PP  |  Assistant Director Monmouth County Planning Division

Abstract:

When towns or regions prepare mitigation plans, they often overlook the importance arts, historic, and cultural (AHC) resources have in recovery efforts. In many ways, these assets are a definitive source of community expression and pride. Their presence or function after a disruptive event often represents a return to “normalcy”. Providing continuity of culture is necessary to the long-term health of a community. Identifying AHC resources at risk from coastal flood hazards, and working with the agencies and organizations responsible for their stewardship, can provide hope and optimism to residents during times of fear and frustration.

In this session, you will learn how the Monmouth County (NJ) Division of Planning incrementally incorporated AHC resources into their planning and policy documents. You will also hear how local organizations and towns leveraged these resources in the post superstorm Sandy environment to reduce conflict, improve resilience, and better prepare for the next inevitable disruption.

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Title: New York and New Jersey Coastal Re-study Update 
Presented by:
Elena Drei-Horgan, PhD  |  AECOM

Abstract:

Accurate coastal flooding risk assessment results not only from the use of best available data but, especially, from the application of methodologies and approaches in the field of coastal modeling that are based on the most up-to-date and advanced modeling techniques. The ongoing coastal restudy for the New York City and New Jersey shorelines is an example of a Flood Insurance Study where updated FEMA methodologies and best practices are coupled with the state-of-the-art science in order to model storm surge and wave propagation, the behavior of tropical and extratropical cyclones, and compute nearshore hazards that are reflective of specific coastal morphologies ranging from gently-sloping beaches, along barrier islands, to heavily developed metropolitan armored shoreline.

This presentation will focus on describing the advanced methodologies implemented in the ongoing New York and New Jersey Coastal Restudy, highlighting differences between the current study and the 2009 FEMA Region II Coastal Surge Project to include unique techniques and innovation adopted such as GIS desktop analyses, tide/surge interaction, and JMP-OS/EST statistical approaches. The talk will also present innovative outreach solutions that include earlier engagement of local stakeholders, from the very beginning of the study, and their participation in the study’s review. An overall project update will also be provided as part of this presentation.


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TRACK 2   |   THE FUTURE OF FLOOD INSURANCE

Title: How Communities Can Prepare for Risk Rating 2.0
Presented by:
Tom Little  |  Risk Reduction Plus

Abstract:

Coming Soon

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Title: Private Flood Insurance – Do’s and Don’ts 
Presented by:
Tyler Ardron  |  Risk Reduction Plus

Abstract:

Coming Soon

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TRACK 3   |   OUTREACH AND EDUCATION

Title: Land Use Enforcement for Floodplain Managers 
Presented by:
Pete Keledy  |  NJDEP Coastal & Land Use Enforcement

Abstract:

Discussion will provide an overview of regulated areas and activities covered by the Flood Hazard Area Control Act, and its overlap with freshwater wetlands and CAFRA regulations. We will also provide a brief overview of GeoWeb (an important tool in determining the likelihood of a proposed activity being within a regulated area), the procedure for requesting an investigation by CLUE through the DEP Hotline, an overview of common violations and how they are addressed through the enforcement process, and how to achieve compliance with enforcement documents through either restoration and/or the land use permitting process. Real-world examples will be provided throughout the presentation to demonstrate what violations, restoration, and compliance looks like.

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Title: FEMA Riverine Non-Regulatory Products for New Jersey 
Presented by:
George Ibrahim  |  NJDEP

Abstract:

A workshop to build local capacity for implementing mitigation actions using the newly released FEMA riverine non-regulatory products. Communities can now use new tools to know their flood risks, create strategies to reduce flood risks and search for funding opportunities.

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Title: The Earth is a Planet Water
Presented by:
Benny Tafoya  |  City of Ocean City

Abstract:

Water is not a resource, water is life and needs to be protected.

About 71 percent of the Earth’s surface is water-covered, and the oceans hold about 96.5 percent of all Earth’s water. Water also exists in the air as water vapor, in rivers and lakes, in icecaps and glaciers, in the ground as soil moisture and in aquifers, and even in you and your dog.

All of the water that has ever existed is still here but it needs to be treated with the reverence it deserves, without water there is no us.


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TRACK 4   |   STORMWATER UTILITIES

Title: When it Rains, it Pours – Clean Stormwater and Flood Reduction Act  
Presented by:
Eleni Giannikopoulos  |  Suburban Consulting

Abstract:

The Clean Stormwater and Flood Reduction Act provides municipalities, counties, utilities and authorities the tool to proactively address and/or manage flooding, improve existing stormwater conveyance infrastructure and address adverse impacts of inadequate stormwater management due to budgetary limitations.

This panel will discuss the history of stormwater management in the State of New Jersey and creation of this bill, dive into the Municipal Finance benefits and implications when forming a Stormwater Utility and the technical considerations when assigning fair and equitable approximation of the proportionate contribution of stormwater runoff from any property served by the utility. While this Bill is not a mandatory requirement, the presentation will outline the regulatory requirements included in the Bill for the formation of a stormwater utility and present guidelines utilized in the formation of over 1,500 stormwater utilities across the country over the past 30 years.

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Title: Advantages and Limitations of a Stormwater Utility: Example from Dayton, Ohio
Presented by:
Scott Homes, PE  |  Mott MacDonald

Abstract:

This presentation will explore the transition to and over twenty years of experience that the City of Dayton, Ohio has in operating a stormwater utility (SWU). Reviewing and understanding Dayton’s SWU experience can provide New Jersey stormwater managers insight regarding the advantages and limitations of a SWU. Before 1997, Dayton’s stormwater infrastructure was managed by the City’s Department of Public Works (PW) and now Dayton’s SWU is managed by the City’s Department of Water (Water). The transition from PW to Water required four plus years to complete and some of the decisions made during the transition included responsible City Department, billing methodology, and initial operating budgets. Early SWU advantages included steady source of funds for operations, focus on stormwater management, and opportunities to educate citizens. Early SWU challenges included dual role (regulatory compliance vs city development), changing operational tasks (street sweeping), billing exemptions, limited funds for capital improvements, and operating budget adjustments. Some of the lessons from the first 20 years include maintenance of stormwater infrastructure (gray or green) is critical to making it last, citizens expect service because they are paying a SWU bill, and ensure your NPDES permit clearly defines the responsibilities of your SWU (challenge the permit if there are items that your SWU is not doing because typical MS4 definitions include roads, curbs/gutters and roadside ditches – will these continue to be maintained by PW or become the responsibility of the SWU). Dayton’s SWU is still maturing. Their last rate study looked at giving credits for optional green infrastructure and charging users for non-stormwater connections.

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Title: Is a Stormwater Utility in my Future?
Presented by:
Elizabeth Treadway  |  Wood Plc

Abstract:

With recent legislative action, the potential to establish dedicated funding for stormwater/ flood mitigation is now a reality. Stormwater user fees have been used throughout the US for over 45 years. This session will focus on the success and failures with a specific focus on process steps for implementation. Topics covered will include governance, public engagement, program development, financial modeling, data management and billing procedures. There is no need to reinvent the wheel – learn how to take the first step to success for funding all-things stormwater.


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TRACK   5 |   TRAINING

Title: HEC HMS Training
Presented by:
Michael Horst, PE, PhD   |  The College of New Jersey